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AMD Exclusive XR770 Twin Turbo Kit

November 19, 2015

We at Addict Motorsport Design are proud to announce the latest in high-performance turbo technology for the Audi 2.7T platform...The XR770 turbo kit designed & built by TiAl Sport and Xona Rotor made exclusively for us at Addict Motorsport Design.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

XONA Rotor

Xona Rotor has implemented a proprietary variable-preload angular contact ball bearing system to its XR product line. By providing increased preload when needed and less when it isn’t, bearing life is extended.

 

Thrust, or axial, loading occurs in a turbocharger when the pressures acting on the turbine and compressor wheels are unbalanced. The thrust load is directed through the turbine shaft and applied to one row of balls in the bearing. To maintain contact of the unloaded row of balls to the races, preload is required. Insufficient preload can cause the unloaded row of balls to slide and skid on their respective races, generating fretting wear on the races that results in reduced life. Excessive preload, on the other hand, accelerates wear and generates heat.

 

The two most common methods to generate preload in a bearing are via mechanical means or by spring force. The mechanical method requires very tight axial tolerances to be held between the bearing’s inner races and opposing outer races. To maintain consistent preload, a mechanical preload system also relies on materials of equal coefficient of thermal expansion and uniform operating temperatures across the entire bearing system.

 

Accordingly, the extreme temperature excursions inherent to a turbocharger present a challenging operating environment for a mechanically-preloaded ball bearing system. The inner bearing race is typically press-fit to the turbine shaft and runs hotter than the outer race, which is thermally decoupled and more directly bathed in cooling oil. Even with a water-cooled bearing housing, the temperature gradient between the outer and inner bearing races can be hundreds of degrees Fahrenheit. Turbocharger applications also present a significant axial temperature gradient along the bearing’s length due to the difference in operating temperature between the turbine and compressor. These temperature differentials will not allow optimum preload to be maintained for all operating conditions . Compared to a mechanical preload system, a spring-based system can maintain a more consistent preload across a wider range of temperatures, but provides lower system stiffness.

 

These conventional approaches to applying preload can only be optimized for a single design point. In all other cases they are either employing insufficient or excessive preload.

 

Xona Rotor’s variable-preload system addresses the limitations of conventional bearing systems. It harnesses the oil pressure delivered to the bearing housing to selectively apply preload to the rotating group as needed . It compensates for the variations in preload induced by thermal expansion and can vary preload as a function of rotational speed . This patented system is exclusive to Xona Rotor . Unlike some ball bearing turbochargers, Xona Rotor XR turbochargers also use the oil to hydraulically damp shaft motions that would otherwise compromise bearing life. The oil also damps axial motions, a feature exclusive to Xona Rotor.

 

Tial R770 Turbo Kit

 

The turbos are Based on twin XONA turbochargers.  The Turbine housings are custom machined for use with the stock manifolds 2.7T Manifolds. The compressor cover was specifically selected for its aerodynamic properties, diffuser area, and overall diameter. The internal rotating assembly is devolved at TiAL to offer the power and response of our design parameters, while preserving the fastest possible spool rate and lowest boost threshold obtainable turbo. What sets TiAL apart is that they've designed this system to achieve a desired characteristic output, rather than engineering a way to bolt on an available turbocharger to the engine. 

 

Kit Contents:

  • Oil Drain Flange gasket and Stainless hardware. 

  • Goodrich 250 PSI Water Lines ( in Silver Silicon fire sleeve ) 

  • Stainless steel Banjos bolts

  • Aluminum Banjo's and Copper washers

  • Actuator Signal Lines: 
    100% solid AN connection, -4AN fitings, and Teflon lined Stainless Steel braided hose. From the compressor cover, to the N75's -4AN tee fitting which is provided. 

  • Actuator Pressure Lines: 
    As to leave nothing to chance with silicone or rubber hose, the WG pressure lines have also been prepared in Stainless steel braided -4 line. There is a custom actuator with a -4AN threaded signal port for a direct adapter free connection. Since the WG's can hold 34 PSI+  ( more if you adjust the preload ),  would be catastrophic with a failed rubber line. 

  • Oil lines:
    -4 An stainless steel braided Lines. 10mm Banjo fittings to the OEM 2.7's Turbo oil distribution block. Protected and shielded with reflective Al/Silicon fire sleeve. 

  • One piece inlets: 
    In stainless.  2.25" dia, over the stock 1.9". Designed to specifically fit these turbos and there new location of the compressor cover. 

  • Silicon Recirculation Tubing: 
    Stock BBV Location and control can be retained.

  • Silicon Couplers: 
    There are 4 in the kit. Each of them is of 4 Ply construction with aramid webbing, not the cheaper 3.  Black is standard, but red and blue can be ordered too. 2 hump hoses for the Inlet tubes to Y-pipe. 2 Straight couplers from the compressor Cover - Ic tubing. These are made of pure silicone, they have no organic fillers which will burn out and de-laminate. 

  • Stainless Steel T-Bolt Clamps.

 

 

Click Here to order your set of XR770 Turbos!

 

 

 

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